You are what you #tweet ! – A case for Twitter

Why Twitter?

 

Well, here are some wondrous reasons that render it a class apart from its rivals, that will (hopefully!) be instrumental in converting most of you twitter-cynics into die-hard twitter fans and make the ones who are already into it, proud of being a part of it.

Be it politics, advertising, self-promotion, campaigning, entertainment, Twitter serves as your partner in crime, everywhere. With 231.7 million active users on Twitter worldwide and 100 million of them who regularly log into the service on a daily basis, Twitter is steadily gaining popularity in India too. A recent survey by BrandonGaille.com showed that Twitter has a relatively younger user base with majority of them being from the age group of 23 to 35 years of age as compared to other SNSs like Facebook. With the ever increasing penetration of digital marketing and advertising in businesses, Twitter is one of the very few platforms that not only gives a big boost to one’s products via promoting accounts, tweets and trends, but facilitates that at bare minimum costs possible, thus making it highly affordable. In fact, 80% of its revenues are garnered from advertising and promotional activities. Twitter promotions prove to be highly lucrative as one is charged only for one’s organic activity. According to a recent survey conducted by Nielsen, there are about 3 million websites that integrate with Twitter including top retail brands like Victoria’s secret and Burberry that enjoy a heavy following from not less than 20 lakh followers. It goes without saying that Twitter has this outlandish ability of making your businesses the talk of the town, almost overnight.

logo-twitter-insideiim

 

Are you one of those who often wonder why there are times when you feel like a fish out of water in your B School? Or are you still contemplating on whether a career in management will be a piece of cake you’ll actually enjoy?  More often than not, the reasons for such cynicism invariably boil down to either lack of good communication skills, one’s inability of mixing with people or being plain shy to the thought of networking. Well, if that is so, you most certainly belong to a class of people, who find/will find it extremely difficult to sustain themselves in this big, bad universe of businesses. However, the world has not yet ended for you. Twitter, provides you with a platform to learn to express your opinions on a variety of issues that plague the society, interact with people from different disciplines and ultimately, feel accepted by the community. This not only helps you come out of your hard-shelled cocoon by instilling the confidence in you, of putting forth your views and ideas in front of a bunch of complete strangers, but also, encourages innovative thinking – which is the need of the hour, as far as the current business scenario is concerned. It can prove to be a lucrative option for artists in search of mediums to showcase their inherent talents and innovations. With likes of Lady Gaga and Justin Bieber who enjoy a fan following of about 2.8 crores each,  who use Twitter as a medium to promote their activities, their Indian counterparts are slowly catching up. It also facilitates exchange of ideas and intellect with peers, leaders from different walks of life and professionals, who are experts in their fields and are otherwise, beyond our reach.

A very recent trend that has been observed in the professional world is that, along with personality and expertise gauging websites like Facebook and Linkedin that are traditionally used to assess the suitability of candidates, potential recruiters are also increasingly browsing through their twitter pages to gauge their real personality, owing to the fact that it has the ability to provide a far more candid portrayal of individuals. According to The Undercover Recruiter, 32% of Twitter’s super social job seekers have leveraged Twitter in their job hunt and received referrals via Twitter.

This ‘Short Messaging Service of the Internet’ – as it is rightly called, has this marvellous ability of delivering news even faster than the speed of light. Take the case of the very recent Boston bombings or the killing of the very controversial Osama Bin Laden; twitter-verse was well aware of them, even before the news was broken on air by the leading news channels. As most of the students today, especially the ones into management courses, find it extremely difficult to steal time from their ever-so-busy schedules to dedicate to knowing about the happenings of the world, this comes in handy.

In the rat race that most students are made to participate in, the levels of stress and frustration are sky high. In such a situation, it becomes mandatory for one to vent one’s feelings out, so that they do not, in any way, hamper their efficiency. This is where Twitter acts as one’s not-so-secret diary, which in some cases might help one get a word or two of empathy and help combat the ensuing loneliness and desolation. Twitter verse, is one of the very few places, where one can freely pour one’s feelings out and not feel guilty about it.

The one thing that is extremely important in the professional world, is the art of being thoroughly precise. However, it is something that is not every Tom, Jack and Harry’s cup of coffee and hence, needs to be worked upon. Twitter, with its cap of 140 characters, trains individuals on how to be sententious and at the same time not compromise on the idea or the information.

And, here comes the best part – Twitter has not yet been invaded by pestering relatives (unlike Facebook), much to the respite of most of us. One can freely communicate with one’s friends from the other planet (yes! provided, they have embraced twitter too!) and it can act as your secret informer; after all, stalking is caring secretly!

India ranks 6th in terms of the percentage of Twitter users (2.87%). Of late, social media has seen an explosive growth and Twitter is no exception. After mulling over the brilliant advantages that Twitter offers, it would be counterproductive if someone chooses not to be a part of this wonderful creation. Therefore, all we can say is you hate it, you love it but you cannot even imagine of staying away from it.

So, what are you waiting for !? Its time to #tweet up!

 

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Read other stories by Venu here

Read everything about IIM Kozhikode here

 

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Venu Merh

Message Author

Kaptains of Kozhikode – Rahul Thanugula – The Adept Artist

In today’s world, ‘talent’ & ‘versatility’ are the two secret ingredients of a successful career. The diversity of your interests & hobbies says a lot about you & to a certain extent, gives you that much-needed edge over your peers. Rahul Thanugula, a talented sketcher, an expert in playing different musical instruments & an occasional mimic explains how an artistic inclination in life always helps.

marilyn

 

1. Well, I’m sure a lot of people would agree to me when I say that ‘you were born with a pencil in your hand’. Your paintings & sketches including the caricatures that you make are surreally real.

When did you start painting/sketching? Who is your role-model when it comes to ‘sketching’, which happens to be your favourite genre? Will you ever be willing to adopt it as a full time career? 

First of all, thank you for the compliments, Venu. Sketching is indeed my favourite form of art as of now. Sub-genres of my interest are landscapes & human-forms (which include caricatures). I used to draw still-life during my early childhood but was not very serious about all this then. Not until, say, a year ago.  But now, I spend several hours a week to practice different styles & techniques by taking inspiration from online sources. It is difficult to choose one out of the many artists that I admire but nevertheless, if I still have to pick one, it has to be the legendary cartoonist Shri. R. K. Laxman. The simplicity & the ease with which he fuses various social & political issues in his cartoons is awe-inspiring. I cannot help but mention that his illustrations for the ‘Malgudi Days’ will remain in my heart forever.

abc

harry

 

sachin

Everyone loves to make a profession out of their passion but becoming financially successful in the field of arts is still very difficult in our country. As on today, I don’t have any plans of taking up sketching as a full-time career. However, in future, I may think of pursuing it as a part-time career. But as far as my short term plans are concerned, I will continue to learn & practice the art. I am keen on learning oil-painting professionally.

 

2. Music, as they say, is the strongest form of magic. IIM Kozhikode gives ample opportunities to all its music enthusiasts to nurture & showcase their talents.

You are a regular performer at the musical programmes that are held in college. You play a lot many instruments – Keyboard, Flute, Mouth Organ – to name a few. Have you leant these instruments professionally? Despite the busy B-School schedules, you still manage to take time out to practice, participate & perform. How do you do that?

I completely agree with you. IIM Kozhikode does provide ample opportunities to hone our abilities. A lot of it can be attributed to the overall college environment. There is immense scope of learning from peers especially for people who don’t have any professional training but yet, want to learn the art. Luckily many of my batch-mates are highly knowledgable with respect to music. Also, we have many occasions where we get a chance to perform on stage. I also cannot forget to acknowledge the contribution of our college’s music club – Krescendo that leaves no stone unturned to promote the interest for music in campus.

 

with_harmonica

 

I don’t have any formal training in music. I’ve learnt most of it from online resources (Special thanks to YouTube.com). It all started with buying a Harmonica (Because, Harmonica was ‘cheaper’ & did not have the potential to burn a hole in my pocket!). I used to play some tunes from movies using it. Then I was introduced to Flute by a friend, which I have to say, was initially very difficult to play. Later, I met a recording artist at his studio where I got a chance to play the Keyboard. That is when I discovered that the Keyboard can serve to be my personalized tutor with the potential to acquaint me to the basics of music (basics like pitches, scales, octaves etc.). Since then, I started practicing all the three instruments in parallel.  But last year, I decided to spend more time with the Flute & it still is my primary focus right now. I love the sound that it produces & furthermore, I believe it is one of the most versatile instruments with the capability of producing the ‘magic’ we associate with music.

 

with_flute2

 

It would be appropriate here to say that music like any art form requires continuous practice. Therefore, despite the busy academic schedule, I try to dedicate some part of each day to music. Sometimes, I have to prioritize my activities & there are sleepless nights too, but I never miss spending my precious few hours with music. There is no deviation whatsoever, at least in this regard. 

3. You have a fair amount of work experience with companies like HPCL. Do you think proximity to art helps people progress in the professional world? What message would you like to give to others who are apprehensive about pursuing their hobbies after entering the big, bad corporate world? 

As someone has rightly said – “Art is a means to escape the world without actually leaving your home”. One thing that every school teaches is that the extra-curricular activities are required to refresh minds & make children perform better in academics. Same holds true when we take up professional responsibilities. We all need an escape window from the daily work burdens. That is why people party & visit places to relax.  Art can be one of such many revitalizing activities. It can provide a peace of mind & impart a sense of satisfaction. Moreover, engaging in arts keeps our creative instincts intact & also helps us maintain the drive to take-up challenging tasks, which again is one of the important requirements at workplaces. However, I can’t vouch, not as of now, that indulging in arts will substantially add to the progress in professional world. At least not for everyone, considering that every profession is unique & demands a different set of skills. It is not in every case that our hobbies are relevant to our work place. But again, there is nothing wrong in spending time in arts.

You are right when you say that a few people are apprehensive about pursuing their hobbies once they get busy with their professional life. There are many reasons for doing so. Sometimes, it is simply because after tedious stints at offices people face difficulties in finding time & energy for any other activities, leave alone hobbies. What I feel is that a little amount of time per day should not be a trouble. If not 10 hours a day, 10 minutes should be okay. In other cases, it could be because of lack of encouragement & inspiration. It is necessary to stay engaged with our interests. For example, a person with interest in painting can visit art museums & exhibitions & of course, browse through artworks over the Internet. Due to advancements happening in the digital world today, everything is just a click away. One can always follow blogs & pages pertaining to their interests.

 – Venu Merh

 

Venu Merh

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

Follow Kaptains of Kozhikode

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Venu Merh

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Message Author

The Power of Positive Expectations

With the summer placement season just around the corner (with some colleges having completed the process already) talking about how power of positivity can work wonders, is of relevance. Amidst the multitude of pre-placement presentations, innumerable lengthy forms to be filled & the general clutter that almost engulfs the entire batch, even the most experienced of students find themselves lost & helpless at times.

Today, we live in a world where the absolute definitions of satisfaction & happiness have no meaning. We always compare ourselves with others in terms of whether or not are we better off than them. However, what we fail to understand is that this precisely is the root-cause of most of the distress that we feel in life.

In such a scenario, one of the very effective weapons that can help us combat or at least minify the tension and the ensuing suffering, is the power of our own expectations.

achi

As someone has rightly said, competition definitely brings the best in products, but unfortunately ends up bringing out the worst in some people. As we know, according to the phenomenon of self-fulfilling prophecy, a positive prediction, sooner or later, directly or indirectly, causes itself to become true due to positive feedback between belief and behaviour. You are what you believe you are. Expect the best of yourself and work untiringly hard towards achieving it. As Norman Vincent Peale says if you paint in your mind a picture of bright and happy expectations, you put yourself into a condition condusive to your goal.

Prophecy

All the best !

– Venu Merh

 

Venu Merh

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Kaptains of Kozhikode – Dr. Arjun A.L. – The Benevolent Doctor

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Message Author

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Message Author

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Message Author

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Message Author

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Message Author

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author

Message Author

A major chunk of B-School students come from the usual disciplines of engineering & commerce. In such a scenario, getting to know the rationale behind the decision of those rare breeds of lawyers & doctors to opt for an MBA after their highly laborious education & somewhat successful careers never ceases to baffle us. We tried to decipher this by interviewing Dr. Arjun, an MBBS, a philanthropist, a proud blood-donor & currently, a management student IIM Kozhikode. He strongly believes in the philosophy that if you are a blood donor, you are a hero to someone, somewhere, who receives your gracious gift of life. Here’s what he had to say about all this.

1.  Medicine is a noble profession. As has been said by someone, giving health to people is closest one can get to God. What do you have to say about this?

Doctors are undoubtedly God’s gift to mankind. You get an opportunity to be the healer, to be the one who helps others get rid of their suffering. It is not just a sheer act of benevolence, but is highly challenging in nature. The course itself is structured in a way that you start with basics of human body & later, scale up to diagnosing & treating some of the most complex diseases. I see it as a blend of an audacious challenge & the will to serve people, which gives one the opportunity to keep learning constantly, become more skilful by the day & eventually, grow as an individual.

2. Education in medicine, like in most of the other countries, is a fairly rigorous programme in India. You not only have to befriend tomes for the rest of your life, but dedicate yourself completely to serving people. What inspired you to take up a challenging course like MBBS & upon its completion, another equally arduous & significantly disparate one- MBA?

I believe that in order to grow, an individual should never stop learning & acquiring new skills. Taking up medicine from a renowned institution like Government Medical College, Kozhikode was instrumental in imparting knowledge which I believe not just made me a good clinician but also gave me the analytical & interpersonal communication skills that significantly influenced my interest & decision to take up a course in management.

I always wanted to pursue public healthcare management. I started off with a project on implementing a national programme to prevent non-communicable diseases in rural Kerala. Within one year, my clinic was chosen to be the best clinic for its impeccable contributions to the village. During the course of my project, I was able to extend my services to 15,000 patients & was able to identify about 1,000 new undiagnosed patients with diabetes & hypertension. Around the same time, I also handled an NGO project that involved screening of infectious diseases like STDs among the migrant labourers in Kozhikode. These two roles were instrumental in dawning in me the realization that my prowess in medicine will definitely influence the health status of people, but its effect can be strengthened further by proper management & execution of projects. This prompted me to pursue a career in healthcare management.

3.  According to what is the usual notion, doctors are considered to be poor in subjects that are even remotely related to Mathematics. However, most of the B-school entrance exams in India test one’s quantitative ability to a reasonably large extent. How did you manage to crack one of the toughest entrance exams that exist in India today- CAT? What tips would you like to give doctors like you & other aspirants in general, who’re eyeing admissions in the top B-schools of India this year?

I am of the opinion that CAT tests your basic quantitative ability, something that does not require any hi-fi Mathematics knowledge. I used to practise previous question papers whenever I used to get a breather from work. I believe that for someone who has a basic idea  & interest in Mathematics, CAT is a complete cakewalk. I was interested in Mathematics since my school days & used to score decently well. Hence, even after a break of 8 years during my MBBS & job, it was not a bed of thorns for me.

Practising problems & brushing up concepts regularly can give you the confidence & knowledge to nail CAT. Enrolling in national level test modules, analysing your performance every now & then & making the necessary improvements in your weak areas is the right recipe to a successful entrance exam season.

4. Donating blood is equivalent to gifting a few minutes of your lifetime to somebody else. You are involved with the Social Service Group on Kampus & often organize & encourage blood donation. Recently, you received the ‘Best Performer Award’ from SBI for your self-less contribution in their Safe Blood Initiative Programme. What is your motivation behind such altruistic acts?

Social service group of IIM Kozhikode organizes socially significant activities all throughout the year. The committee & its activities are always focussed on bringing improvements in the lives of others & moulding students into socially responsible managers of tomorrow.

Arjun_award

The SBI Safe Blood Initiative in association with the blood bank of Government Medical College, Kozhikode & Kerala state AIDS control society was held in Kampus very recently. The quality & the scale of the blood donation camp helped us in receiving the award.

blood

 

Blood, as you all know, is a non-substitutable agent of our body & can only be replaced by blood from some other individual. Giving half a litre of blood does not affect one’s health adversely, but it can definitely help another individual have a healthy life. These small acts of kindness can bring significantly large improvements in the quality of others’ lives. The satisfaction that you get when you see someone smiling because of your petty activity is the main encouragement that drives me to repeat these acts again & again.

I will continue to do my bit to make this world a better place to live in & would request others to do the same, in whichever small way they can.

FRIENDS SPEAK !
Amrita Saha, Coordinator, Social Service Group, IIM K

AmritaSSG is one of the oldest committees on Kampus. It is one of the few committees on kampus that makes sure that people stay rooted to the society while they are busy reaching for the stars. Blood donation is one of the most frequent initiatives undertaken by the committee. There are rampant apprehensions & misgivings among people about the same & SSG tries hard to dispel them. It is great to have a doctor (Dr. Arjun) on your side to bridge the knowledge gap for these people.

Arjun, with his friendly nature & reassuring style is able to instil confidence among those who are initially scared of the idea & inspires them to join the noble cause. He remains instrumental to the outreach of SSG group of IIM Kozhikode & we could not have touched the hearts of so many without his help!

As told to Venu Merh

Venu_Merh-iimk-insideiim

About Venu

An Upantya Visharad in Hidustani Sangeet and in Bharatnatyam, Venu has been the epitome of versatility and consistency throughout school and college life. An EC engineer, she was a member of AIESEC & NU Tech where she managed various activities. She is a big Sheldon Cooper fan, loves micro blogging and working for stray animal welfare. She is currently a management student at IIM Kozhikode (Class of 2015).

Twitter handle – @foodasaur

You can read all stories by Venu here. Follow her on venu.insideiim.com

 

 

Profile gravatar of Venu Merh

Venu Merh

Message Author