Indian Navy Band performs at IIMA

The Indian Navy Band performed at the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad on the 21st of February. The concert was organized by the ninth batch of the Armed Forces Programme 2013-14 and was the first of its kind at IIMA. The band had come all the way from Mumbai and has performed at numerous concerts across the globe.
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The concert was a musical feast set against the amber hued Louis Kahn Plaza. The Band performed different forms and genres of music, producing a rich tapestry and embodying India’s abiding characteristic of ‘Unity in Diversity’. They left the audience awe struck by their magical performance. Their rendition of ‘Cornfield Rock’, ‘Bharat HumkoJaan Se Pyara’, ‘Rock and Roll Medley’, ‘Havana’ and ‘SareJahan Se Achcha’ were some of the highlights of their performance.
The turnout was overwhelming with the entire LKP filled with people who at times hummed to the tune of famous numbers like ‘Tum hi ho’, ‘Monica, Oh my Darling’ and at times were spell bound at the immaculate execution of tracks like ‘Toss the Feathers’, ‘The Final Countdown’.
The Director of IIMA Prof. Ashish Nanda praised and marvelled at the performance by the band and presented them with a token of appreciation. The concert ended with the Band playing the Indian National Anthem.
The concert was a true testimony to the glory of the Indian Navy Band and to the fact that the men in white are equally talented in all spheres of life.

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IIM Ahmedabad Interview Experience And Preparation Tips By An IIM A Student

An interview for a seat in one of the best B-schools in the country which have produced some of our greatest business and economic leaders – it is bound to induce some amount of nervousness and anxiety. It’s completely natural and totally unnecessary. An interview, in its most basic form, is a conversation and not an interrogation; and everyone, especially the interviewer, likes to have a good, healthy conversation. What that requires on the interviewee’s part is the confidence to sustain one, and the twin sources of confidence going into an interview are: 1. Surety of one’s knowledge and preparation and 2. Practice – the feeling that you’ve been there and had those very conversations before. For both of these, an aspirant is not generally short on resources. Therefore, if you are willing to give it time and apply yourself, there is nothing standing in your path.

I will first talk about what topics I covered for my preparation, and then give a brief overview of my interview – about how it fit right into the preparation process. Now there’s a necessary disclaimer here: the fact that this worked for me in no way means that it will work for everybody. This is just a generalised framework which I believed covered most of the topics that could come up in an interview; everyone can have his or her own structure. That said, let us have a look.

  1. Know About Yourself

This bit is the most important. If you fumble on a question such as describe yourself, which is by far the most common question in these interviews, then it gives a very strong negative impression. A couple of days of intermittent introspection should be enough to ace this bit otherwise. Broadly, two things need to be covered here: 1. Who are you? (Achievements, strengths, weaknesses, leadership and group experiences, interests, hobbies, why should we take you, what differentiates you etc.); and 2. Why are you here? (Future plans – 5/10 years down the line, how does PGP fit into them, for freshers – why MBA now etc).

  1. Know About The World

Iran-Turkey relations have never decided an interview. Even though general knowledge is an essential part of your preparation, you are not expected to know everything. However, a basic understanding of the polity, history and economy of your immediate surroundings, state and country is essential. You should also focus on things immediately attributable to you, such as your interests and hobbies, the city you live in, the school you went to, major landmarks near you etc. GK about your undergraduate specialisations should be covered. Other than this, coverage of current happenings and some essential static GK (amply provided in coaching institutes’ handbooks) should hold you in good stead.

  1. Know Your Subjects

This one’s pretty straightforward. Deep dive into a couple of favourite subjects; know the essentials of the rest. This should ideally be an important criterion in evaluating you, and would almost certainly come up in some form or the other.

  1. Know What And Whom You’re Interviewing For

You should not be found wanting on the basic aspects of the course you will be doing or the institution you are interviewing for. Visiting the institute’s website and Wikipedia page should suffice in most cases.

And Then…

Have Some Practice Interviews

Nothing prepares you for interviews like practice. As you get more feedback, you will understand a lot more about your delivery and shortcomings in terms of presentation and knowledge. Specifically, this will help iron out any issues with the body language and the tone used during the interview. For some people, there will be other b-school interviews lined up as well, but some practice interviews are still advisable since in the former there is no constructive feedback.

My Experience

There were two (now I know: excellent) professors in my panel. My interview started with a simple “So Aditya, tell us why we should select you?” From my oft-rehearsed monologue, they moved onto Angel investing (I’d mentioned an internship at an Angel fund), and asked me why they were called angels and my responsibilities there. Since I had some strategy analysis in my JD, they moved on to subjects: Strategy and Micro-economics (one interviewer was an Economics professor and asked about consumer surplus). Then we moved on to the distinction between Delhi and New Delhi, upon which we debated for a bit since I didn’t know completely (Careless, I know). The last leg of the interview was about my hobbies. They focused on cricket and cooking. Under the former, I was asked about the cricket matches going on then. Cooking went on for a bit longer. On being asked, I told them I could cook pasta well. I was immediately asked about the shapes (I couldn’t remember Fusili). In retrospect, I think the final question was primarily asked to have fun. However, at that point in time, in the room, it was highly unnerving: “Why do you sauté the garlic before tomatoes while making the pasta sauce?” I didn’t know the science, so I told them sautéing the garlic released its flavours, and putting tomato in first would make the garlic soggy but they seemed highly dissatisfied and continued to probe unsuccessfully for a minute or so. After this struggle, I was asked to leave and given a candy as a parting gift. Even though at that time I was unsure about my performance, my preparation had ensured that I had something meaningful to say for every question thrown my way, barring the last one. I still don’t know the science behind putting garlic before tomatoes.

In Conclusion

In the end, it’s the performance on the final day that counts. I’d suggest lots of sleep and relaxation right before it. I know people who did not prepare at all and made it by being calm and confident in the interview. I also know people with very good percentiles who skipped their MDI and Kozhikode interviews to prepare for Ahmedabad but didn’t make it. The lesson here is that it’s important to know things, and it is equally important to ensure that you can convey things convincingly. To conclude, I’d say: don’t worry, create and follow a structure for the preparation, practice, and give it your best, because you only have one shot at it.

 

 

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About the Author:

Aditya Khanna for InsideIIM

Aditya Khanna is a BMS graduate from SSCBS, University of Delhi, and is currently pursuing PGP at IIM Ahmedabad. A keen reader and writer, he is a huge Conan Doyle, JD Salinger and Allan Poe fan. He also loves the game of cricket and the art of cooking.

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Life Of A B.Tech Student At IIM Ahmedabad – Nishant Shah

14th April 2016. 1 a.m.

As I lie down on the bed, contemplating the way my life would take turns from now on, there was a sense of apprehension surrounding my thoughts. They weren’t a liberated lot anymore. They weren’t carefree. They were sceptical. They were restricted. And you can’t blame the autonomy with which the mind generates thoughts at times. It had been almost 9 hours since I made it to IIM Ahmedabad, and once all the euphoria and celebrations aggrandising the event would settle in, the reality was bound to sink in.

 

What was this reality anyway?

No, it was not the fear of competition. No, it was not the fear of rigorous academics. It was definitely not the fear of placements. It was something larger than that. It was the fear of not being able to make the most out of this wonderful place full of opportunities and at the same time, not having the slightest clue about what all this place offers. Wow, that is scary. You want to do all that is possible but don’t know all that is possible.

The place gives you the opportunity to change the world. Though at the same time, it provides you with all the resources to enjoy the world. And that’s the choice you got to make as you roll along. One of the most difficult ones as it turns out.

 

30th December 2016.

Fast forward some eight months and here I am. More than six months old at this place. If everything can be quantified, a 33.33% MBA and almost 67% worthy of a PGP1 survivor T-shirt.

 

Okay, what’s the purpose of this piece of writing?

To recollect what all I have gone through at A. To share what all might be relevant for people dreaming of being at A. But most importantly, to build an aura of suspense about the life at A. And No. There is no sadistic joy in that. As I figured out, and I am sure people senior to me would agree on this, the real pleasure of life here is to stumble along your way to wisdom. To figure out by yourself what all this place is about and what else remains a mere façade. That 2 states might actually be a reality for some people and most of us would wish to lead a Raghuram Rajan life.

 

What all I have gone through at A?

A hell lot of things more than a hell lot of things I already imagined I would go through.

I joined the place early. Some two weeks earlier than two-third of the batch. Though that was not a choice as the PGP office had mandated some extra training for me before I get battle ready, I would have happily volunteered for this extra course anyway as did so many other enthusiastic souls, dying to experience the place early.

And thus started the best two weeks of my life at IIMA. After some few thousand WhatsApp messages flooding the (un) official IIMA converts group daily had become a regular affair, when some of the people-on-the-peak-of-their-lives generating these messages finally met in front of the glowing LKP at 10 in the evening, it was a dazzling affair. I stayed quiet as everyone else talked their heart out, networked. It was too early for me to feel comfortable with the place, with the people, I, at times, looked with awe and appreciation.

 

Why these two weeks so special?

After repetitive warnings by every Tuchha (A lingo for second year students of PGP course, who mostly chill out and do all sorts of activities that make a first year student dying to be in the second year) that these two weeks would be the only two weeks to enjoy at the campus for a long time, I finally succumbed to their prediction and decided to cool off.

The two weeks were spent in getting to know a lot of new people. People with a variety of backgrounds, a variety of thoughts. People with so unique freshness about them. People who were mostly curious, just as I was, about what was to unfold. I had a preoccupation that people here, largely, would carry a bit overstretched obsession with self-respect. Luckily, it wasn’t the case for most of the lot. The word ‘friendly’ did define so many.

6th June 2016 would always remain a fond memory for me. That was the day when I quite literally lived my dream. The hallowed Well-shaped class finally had a space reserved for me. I was allowed to study from some of the best professors in the country, sitting with some of the best minds in the country. What I learned academically during this extra course had something to do with MS Excel and how to give public speeches. Though hardly 20% of time and energy were spent in learning this something extra and the rest, as advised, were devoted to making ‘friends’.

Good times fly by and so did these two weeks. New faces became familiar and few of them became comforting. A ground was laid for some amazing times ahead.

I felt ready for 22nd June 2016. The day when the remaining two-thirds joined in and completed the unity. The day when I got to know my section and my study group. The day when the dorm finally looked alive and dorm-like.

 

The drill begins…

22nd June 2016. 8:45 a.m.

Well, this time was yet to assume the dreadfulness it would eventually assume. On the first day of the first slot of the first term, everyone was expected to display their evanescent punctuality. The first class started in Class Room 10, new campus right at the stroke of 8:45 a.m. First time in my life, I had my name tag in front of my seat and with that the official right to that seat, to that angle, to those sideys. (Another lingo used to denote anyone who lives, sits, pees, etc. beside you. They assume unparalleled importance because it is their duty to wake you up on time). 

 

The Story builds up…

The kind of things that happen in an IIMA classroom should better remain a mystery. But from an intellectual factory to an anarchic zoo, it takes every shape and form. From thumping (to appreciate humour mostly) to slow clapping (to display utter irritation for a Desperate Class Participation and/or a failed attempt at humour in front of 90 unapologetic souls), it expresses itself thoroughly.

The first class ends exactly at 10 a.m., and with that, so many sleeping souls in the class slowly wake up to have their breakfast. Most of the liquids including tea and coffee lose their ever so famous ability to keep people awake here and when the next class starts at 10:20 a.m. sharp, the same set of people would have their eyes shut to the worldly affairs.

The rest, however, participate heavily in Class Discussions. (You get graded for your contributions in the class, and thus a sensible thing not to sleep when you are so easily allowed to). It always flabbergasted me when a Marketing professor would come up with a solution to a case study that the collective mind of 90 students was so unable to even reach closer to. But that has always been a joy of classroom discussions.

Three classes on a typical day, with the last one ending at 1:10 p.m. The time from 1:10 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. is spent in anticipation of 1:45 p.m. This is the exact time at which the notification for a surprise quiz on any subject pops up from everywhere- email, text, notice board, your section group, your study group and your friends. Though surprise quizzes didn’t seem much like surprises as people eventually figured out the schedules, PGP office could still outwit the batch of 400 students so royally on several occasions. You have one hour to collect the notes and prepare for the exam. Or else you could just sleep and let the destiny decide the course of action (Or your sidey in the exam room).

The quiz ends and with that the campus sleeps. Wow. How often do we sleep? In class, before the quiz, after the quiz. There has to be some reason behind this. Anyway, the campus wakes up again at around 6 in the evening and from then on, is full of activities that define the life at A.

Study group meetings (That often involves discussions on EVERYTHING and is usually a fun outing), midnight submissions, Case preparation (Three classes require some four hours of case preparation in total. Though this is an ideal world where everyone prepares for cases religiously. IIMA is everything but an ideal world), Quiz preparation, Club meetings (Clubs- A collective noun for all those entities who are extremely difficult to get into and people literally ‘run’ for their lives to be a part of some), hang out at Café Tanstaafl, hang out at Tapri, Hangout at Nescafe, Hangout at Café Tanstaafl (No, I haven’t repeated anything), etc, etc, etc.

Quite a list, isn’t it? Things quiet down at around 3 in the morning in the campus. This is one hour before the food outlets stop room delivery for the day. People sleep again at around 4 in the morning (Things presented here are highly generalised. I myself sleep early and so do some more on the campus). Such a wonderful time to wake up, 4 in the morning. Not here. Not anymore.

This leaves you with exactly 3 hours 45 minutes to sleep. And this explains why people sleep at awkward places at awkward times throughout the day. One of the most important decisions one would ever make here is whether to sleep a few minutes extra or go for the breakfast. Most choose the former, despite the only amazing thing that mess serves here is Breakfast. And thus, 8:45 assumes the dreadfulness very shortly in anyone’s A life.

And with this ends a very typical description of the life at A. Things are beyond that, most of the times here.

Words describing them should follow, in days to come.

To be continued…

 

————

About the Author:

Nishant Shah has finished his B.Tech in Mechanical Engineering from NIT, Surat and is currently a  student at IIM Ahmedabad for PGP in Management. He has interned for two months at IIM Ahmedabad under Prof. Vijaya Sherry Chand, working for the Education Innovations Bank.

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IIM Ahmedabad’s Expectations From The Union Budget 2016

B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwM5f-tzas&feature=youtu.be

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwM5f-tzas&feature=youtu.be

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwM5f-tzas&feature=youtu.be

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwM5f-tzas&feature=youtu.be

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwM5f-tzas&feature=youtu.be

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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IIM Ahmedabad Media

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B-school students of 8 campuses across India participated  as part of new series of InsideIIM– ‘Expectations From Budget 2016’ in association with CNBC TV-18.

The following article contains  excerpts of students from IIM Ahmedabad –

Raunak Shah

Here is my wishlist for budget 2016. On the revenue side, even pending the implementation of GST, I think the government immediately needs to begin simplification of the indirect tax regime especially when it comes to excise duty I think even the number of exemptions should be reduced in this budget. Secondly, I think the government needs to be a little more realistic about its disinvestment target so as to avoid expenditure cuts later on. The government barely met 20% of its target of disinvestment this year.

On the expenditure side firstly, subsidy reforms should not be restricted to just fuel subsidies. They must extend to food subsidies. In fact, any further increase in the fuel subsidy budget would make it really difficult for the government to reach its fiscal deficit target especially in light of the 7th pay commission.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGwM5f-tzas&feature=youtu.be

 

Secondly I think, on the expenditure side, the government should spend instead invest heavily in rural infrastructure. I think probably thats the only way in which we can crowd in private investment. As far as Young India and the startup climate of the country is concerned, I have two suggestions for the Finance Minister. Most startups today are aggregators on online market places. A little more clarity on their taxation would really go a long way in helping startups. Secondly, in order to increase the amount of investment in startups, the taxation of angel investments should be reduced. Atleast for a certain quantum.

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