Kiwi Fruit – Value Chain Analysis

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author


Message Author

 

KIWI : NUTRITIONAL POWER HOUSE AND ITS VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 

KIIII

 

KIWI FRUIT

Kiwifruit or Chinese gooseberry (Actinidia deliciosa) is known as ‘China’s miracle fruit, In North East, it is being cultivated in Arunachal Pradesh in some sizable area North Eastern State has diverse agro climatic The kiwifruit grow well from 300-2000m above mean sea level,needs  warm and humid climate it requires moderate to high rainfall conditions. Kiwifruit requires 700-800 chilling hours below 7 0C. The summer temperature should not go beyond 35°C.

 

WHY KIWI FRUIT HAS POTENTIAL

Kiwifruit generally ripens from October to December, which is the lean period for other fruits in the market, so the price for kiwi fruit is always high.The fruits can be stored for longer period of time which makes it possible  to supply for extended period.It has high nutritive and medicinal value It has more fibre than most breakfast cereals, It is a rich source of sugars and several minerals such as phosphorus, potassium and calcium. It is a rich source of vitamin ‘C’ and ‘E’ and low in calories It has multiple use  can eaten fresh,processed in jam etc .seed  used in pastries,flowers in perfume and roots in insecticide.

TOTAL PRODUCTION IN  2010-2011

REGION AREA(HA) PRODUCTION(MT) PRODUCTIVITY(MT/HA) YEAR
NER 2,670 4,097 1.53 2010-2011
ARUNACHAL PRADESH 2,620 3,930 1.50 2010-2011
MIZORAM 50 157 3.14 2010-2011

Source: NHB and State Departments (2010-11)

 

Kiwi fruit is mainly grown in Arunahal Pradesh  it produces around 97% of total kiwi fruit in NER nd rest 3% from Mizoram.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONES IN ARUNACHAL PRADESH

AGRO-CLIMATIC ZONE CROP AREA/DISTRICTS
TEMPERATE KIWI High-hills of West  kameng,ziroTawang,upper subansiri,siang.

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

SEASONALITY OF CROP

CROP JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JLY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
KIWI BEG PEAK LEAN

Source: “An In-depth Market Study and Impact Assessment Report”

VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS

 Production Practices ™™

The most popular varieties grown are Alison and Harvard. During the crop cycle, the farmers do not apply any kind of chemical fertilisers, insecticides,  pesticides and weedicides. Only FyM/Vermicompost are applied at the rate of 5-7 kg per  plant.  At the field level, due to fruit drop and insects, pests and diseases, the fruit loss is nearly  5-10 percent.

Post-harvest Practices:

Harvesting: The fruiting period is two months i.e. October and November. The yield   in the region is nearly 3-4 MT/ha.

Value Addition at Farm Level: the farmers carry out the manual sorting and grading of the fresh produce on the basis of weight as follows:

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) MARKET
A 90 AND ABOVE EXPORT
B 60-90 DOMESTIC
C 50-60 DOMESTIC
D 40-50 PROCESSING

 

Marketing & Logistics:

The fruits are transported in mini trucks without any kind of  packaging, or packed in gunny bags. The farmers either sell the fresh fruit directly  to   consumers   at   the   local   or   main   market The  farmers  carry  the  fruit  on  head  loads  to  the  nearest  transport point and from there it is transported by jeep/maxi to the local market. The post-harvest losses during transportation from local market to main  market are nearly 8-10 percent due to the perishable nature of the fruit.

THE FRUIT SOLD ON THE BASIS OF GRADE

GRADE WEIGHT(GM) FARMER SELLING PRICE(Rs) MARKET MARKT PRICE(Rs)
A 90 AND ABOVE 100/KG EXPORT 150-200/KG
B 60-90 65/KG DOMESTIC 100-125/KG
C 50-60 50/KG LOCAL 75-100/KG
D 40-50 35/KG PROCESSING

 

In most of the cases, the farmers sell the whole orchard to the contractor before harvesting at a pre-fixed price. However, some farmers do sell the produce to the middlemen/aggregators/ traders from outside places such as Guwahati, Silchar, Kolkata and Delhi.

 

PRICE BUILTUP (per kg) FROM FARM GATE TO CONSUMER

Particulars AMOUNT(Rs) PRICE MARKUP(Rs/kg) %CONTRIBUTION
AVG SELLING OF FARMER 65 65 52.11
AGGREGATOR CHARGE(15-20%) 13 78 10.42
TRANSPORT TO MAIN MARKET INCLD  LOADING & UNLOADING 2 80 1.60
COST OF WASTAGE(8-10%) 8 88 6.41
WHOLESALE MARGIN(30-35%) 30.80 118.80 24.69
COST OF WASTAGE(3-5%) 5.94 124.74 4.76

Source: ISAP analysis from various stakeholders’ interaction

 

THE MAJOR CONCERNS

Land Tenure and Ownership System

Land ownership and laws are uneven and unclear in the entire NE Region. The entire system  falls under the following three broad categories:

– Land owned collectively by the villagers

– Land owned by the tribal chiefs, who allot land among the individual households for   shifting cultivation purposes, and

– Individually-owned land.

Poor Cultivation Practices and Low Productivity

Small    land  holdings,   poor   investment     capacity,  general   neglect   and   non-adoption     of scientific cultivation practices are the major constraints for poor return from the crops in the Region and despite the favourable agro-climatic conditions, the   rate   of   production   and   growth   is low

  Poor and Weak Extension System

Despite high potential, difficult terrain with poor connectivity, lack of trained & dedicated  human resources and poor coordination among departments are some of the key factors responsible for ineffective and poor extension programme.

Poor Logistics and Connectivity 

Poor    infrastructure     in  terms   of  roads   and   railways    are  the   main   constraints     in  the development  of  NE  Region Due  to  hilly  terrain,  most  of  the  farmers  transport     their  saleables    on  head    loads   (in  case  of  periodic   markets),    as  the   public transport in the region is expensive and mostly inaccessible from the production zones or villages.The  movement  of  produce  to  main   (urban) markets is through buses/mini trucks/jeeps that add up transportation costs.

Poor Marketing and Post-harvest Infrastructure 

Due to lack of organised and alternative marketing structure in the region, farmers are getting low return compared to the other parts of India, whereas the middlemen get the profit at  their  expense.  Lack    of  primary    processing,    logistics,  marketing    and   post-harvest    infrastructure    across various levels of the value chain, are the major factors for quality detoriation and value loss  of the perishable produce in the region.

Lack of Processing Industries

For NE Region, particularly Arunachal Pradesh the success of growing perishables is closely linked to the success of fruit  processing  units.  The  processing  industry  can  help  in  sorting  out  the  problem  of  proper  disposal  of  perishable  commodities.  To  date,  there  are  hardly  any  cold  storage  facilities  available.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

– Formation of kiwi farmer’s group for efficient marketing practices and price negotiation

– Marketing through organized channel by diret procurement from farm gate by corporate groups

– Logistics systems should be upgraded to access the major market in india.

– Integrated pack house should be installed to grade high quality kiwi to target export and prime Indian market

– Hard berries should be harvested for distant markets

– Certification of organically managed orchards.

 

REFERENCE

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiwifruit.

http://gbpihedenvis.nic.in/html/vol16_1/a.%20singh.htm

www.sfacindia.com

http://www.apeda.gov.in/apedawebsite/index.asp

http://www.sikkimagrisnet.org/General/en/NERMAC.aspx

 

 

 

Profile gravatar of PAWAN TIWARI

PAWAN TIWARI

Message Author