Serendipity

Robert was perceived as a strict individual. He commanded respect in society but much of that respect emanated out of fear for him. It was not that he was aggressive or boisterous or displayed a raging temper. But it was his quiet and grim demeanour coupled with his broad chest and a six-and-a-half-foot tall frame that evoked a sense of awe among people. Robert had a booming voice but not many had heard it. He was the silent-kind who let his presence do the talking.

He had gotten married to Audrey five years ago and were the proud parents of three-year old Rick. Robert was the perfect husband and a doting father. But his interaction with his family was more business-like than anything else. He fulfilled all their needs even before they asked for it and made sure that they were happy, healthy, and well-taken-care-of. But what Audrey and Rick missed the most were emotions from the man. She missed what most other couples generally indulged in – the romantic dinners, the late-night movies, the weekend supermarket shopping. Little Rick, though too young to comprehend, could understand that the way his mother held him was distinctly different from the way his father did.

Robert was a successful investment banker in a multi-national bank in Canary Wharf, Tower Hamlet in London. A six-figure salary, a Mercedes Benz convertible, Armani suits, and a beautiful house in south London – the Smiths were more than just well-off. But Audrey could always sense that her husband was not completely happy. She had often asked him, but whenever she had brought up the topic, he had become very defensive and resorted to stark silence. It was as if the answers were locked up in a box within Robert’s heart and he had hidden the key. It was as if it was down a road that he never intended to travel.

Today was Rick’s third birthday and there was a party at Audrey’s parents’ home in Dover. Robert was not too fond of his in-laws and it had been decided that Audrey and Rick would be leaving for Dover in the morning and he would be joining them later. Audrey was preparing breakfast and Rick was sitting on the sofa surrounded with toys. Robert was engaged in his usual Sunday activity – lounging on the armchair in the den, the Business page of the newspaper flipped open before him.

While getting dressed, Audrey called out, “Bob, do remember to eat lunch. The chicken is in the oven and the mashed potatoes are in the fridge. You won’t forget, will you?”.There was just an, “Uh-huh” from the den – Audrey knew that that was all that she would get out of him. It used to bother her previously, but now she had made her peace with it. “Please leave home early – you know how exacerbating the traffic gets”, she said while double-checking if she had packed Rick’s diapers. Once again, there was a quiet little, “Uh-huh”.

It was 8:30 when they left. Robert had calculated that in order to reach his in-laws’ place in time for the party, he would have to leave by 4:30 in the afternoon – so that gave him a good eight hours. He shaved, took a bath, checked his emails, and by the time he was done with lunch, the clock on the dining table showed 1 pm. He decided to snuggle back into his armchair and on his way there he poured himself a glass of Glen Livet. Robert realized that it had been quite a while that he had had an afternoon to himself. Not that he did not like having his wife and kid around, but ruminating in peace was something that he had always loved. The rocking of the chair, the smoothness of the Scotch, and the ambience of a peaceful Sunday encouraged an uninterrupted chain of thoughts.

A secret about Robert Smith that nobody – absolutely nobody – knew was that he found solace in nostalgia. The road which he never travelled with his wife, his small circle of friends, or his relatives, appeared much more accessible and welcoming when he tread on it alone. Robert’s parents had passed away in a car accident when he was a toddler. He was brought up by his paternal aunt who always claimed with subtlety that he was the reason why she had remained a spinster. He did not remember his parents at all and their presence in his life was limited to the two ornately framed photographs in his bedroom.

What gripped Robert every time he lost himself in reminiscence were his student days. A boarding school from a very young age, followed by four years of hostel life at Oxford, had sown in him the seeds of a self-made man. What surprised Robert even today was how he ended up being a banker. He always had a penchant for the arts. He was a phenomenal violin player all through school and college. He loved to cook and had always dreamed of donning the chef’s hat with pride one day. Actually, his magic with the violin and with food was what had Audrey falling for him in college! He was a different person back then – his curly locks falling on the brow, a wide grin on the face, and a wardrobe full of Pink Floyd T-shirts.

Life was so wonderful back then! Every Saturday after classes, he, along with his two best mates – Conrad and George, used to go to this quaint bar called ‘Glasses’ where they talked about everything under the sun over fish-and-chips and cans of beer. Inebriation seemed so innocent back then! The three friends had decided among themselves that once they graduated, they would set up a restaurant together. No prizes for guessing that Robert would be taking care of the food. But then…..but then something happened and nothing of this had materialized. During their last week of college, when Conrad and George had asked Robert how they should go about their venture, he suddenly backed out. He told them that he needed to do something more meaningful; something that was a more stable source of income; something that is fit for an Oxonian. Leaving his two friends befuddled, he walked away and literally never looked back at them.

Robert never realized when he had fallen asleep and his conscious self gave way to the sub-conscious and his thoughts started flowing like a poetic dream:-

“Four decades old, walking in the beautiful Garden of Eden one sunny April morning,

Suddenly I chance upon my 20-year old self,

Who with an innocuous grin, comes forth asking, “Hey, how’s it going?”

I realize that other than the receding hairline and a bigger belt size nothing much had changed –

Probably the dark ‘Pink Floyd’ T-shirt would not suit me quite as much now,

Whereas the Saville Row suit on me would look boring even back then!

While I was caught up in my own thoughts, he repeats, “I say, you look like one of those really successful men!”

“You must have become the chef that you had always dreamed of, and mastered the violin like no other?”

I just nod your head in denial and quietly say, “Oh why even bother?”

“Then you must be still teaching English to the deprived children in the NGO?”

Head bowed down and silence on the lips is enough to convey a ‘no’.

“What about the little shack where you loved to paint and shared a beer with your mates?”

As I fish for something in your pocket, I reply, “Wait!”

Handing him my business card, I harangue, “I am a high-flying banker with a six figure emolument – I drive a Merc and vacation abroad twice a year – tell me boy, how can I go to such a lowly place today?”

The boy, with unblinking eyes, has nothing to say.

He turns away and before leaving whispers, “Should I grow up at all then?”

As I fumble for answers, I realize that I never actually followed my passion,

I was content to engage in whatever was in fashion.

I try to laugh it off, dismissing it as something inanely funny –

But in my heart, I know that I am so poor that all I have is money.”

Robert woke up with a jerk. Suddenly realization dawned upon him and everything became crystal clear. He was fighting a battle with himself because he was lacking inner peace which eluded him as he was not making his vocation and avocation one. If only he had walked the road less-travelled much earlier and had asked Audrey to accompany him, he would have found not only success but also happiness. As he shook himself up, he made up his mind – he would drive down to Dover, have a heart-to-heart chat with his wife, and do his best to turn things around. And today was not a bad day to start off – it was little Rick’s birthday after all!

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Dipayan Sinha

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There’s no time to stop and stare

Our world today is extremely fast-paced, competitive, and ambitious. We work hard – very hard – for money, for recognition, for appreciation, and even at times, for a better appraisal. That is all perfectly fine and that is how it should be too. We all study diligently, try to get into the best of institutes, and perform to the best of our abilities all in the hope of a great career. So when we finally embark upon that journey, it is only logical that we put in all that we have to give. But is that all? Does being successful ensure peace of mind? This is what I aim to throw light upon. Of course, my insights are completely my own and are derived from my experiences so far.

Wordsworth had written, “The world is too much with us…” – there is no time to stop and stare. It is very important to take out time to enjoy the little pleasures of life. Just as we become lackadaisical and keep procrastinating the work that we have to do, there are a host of people who keep putting off leisure because they just cannot stop working (please refer to Dr Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory!) We have been always taught that we must do the things that are appropriate for our age and working is probably what we should be relentlessly pursuing. But that in no way means that it should be work and work alone and nothing else.

It is alright to take some time off and take that vacation with family or friends that you were always meaning to. It is perfectly alright to spend a day sitting on your couch, watching TV with a bowl of popcorn and a canned soda in front of you. Run in the park like you used to when you were a kid; step out into the rain and let it soak you wet; engage in a kite-flying battle with your best buddies; let go of yourself when you enter a bakery; leave your car in the garage and take your wife/spouse out on a date by availing the public transport. And most importantly, all this must be done without thinking twice about what ‘others might be thinking of us’.
When we were growing up, most of us had a penchant for painting, some of us loved rhyme and used to pen down poems at will, while a few others had their forte in the performing arts. What happened to all of that once we entered the hallowed gates of a college or a University? How did these once-favourite-hobbies end up in the back burner so soon? If you have not wondered about this so far, you might just want to do so now.

People who have thought about these reasons often come up with the excuse that pursuing their childhood interests now would render them childish in front of their friends, peers, colleagues, superiors, and society at large. But my point is, isn’t that the concern of the entire society today? Everybody is thinking through their actions keeping in mind in what light would others perceive them in. But that was never the criteria – ever. Last time I checked, it was my life and I was in charging of living it. There is a famous quote which goes as, “Never explain yourself to anyone – those who know you would not need it and those who do not would not believe you.”

In our busy schedules, it is extremely important to take time out for ourselves. Maybe an hour in a day which is dedicated to you and you only. Keep your laptops and cell phones away if possible and spend the time exactly how you want to. It is very important to read for pleasure as it keeps our creative senses well-oiled and also makes us appreciate the powers of imagination in others. I am a firm advocate of the philosophy that the one of the keys to break the monotonicity of life can be found within the pages of good literature. Meditation and/or any other form of physical exercise is also of paramount importance as far as healthy living is concerned. The underlying point is that you should find a vent to release your stress and tensions and make sure that you use it every day.

In conclusion, I would like to say that I am, in no way, trying to be preachy. I am nobody to guide others on how to lead their lives. For God’s sakes, I am only twenty-five years of age! But all that I wanted to drive home was the fact that both qualitative and quantitative research across the world has shown that the Happiness Quotient of human beings is coming down and stress levels are going up. My humble request is that if we are working so hard to ensure a better world for ourselves and our progeny, let us at least take out some time to enjoy it ourselves as well.

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Dipayan Sinha

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Case Competitions in Business Schools

Before joining a B-school, I had read somewhere (probably on this forum itself) that B-school competitions are tough to crack and people ought to respect those who do. Not fully understanding the nuances of the statement, it was last December that I got into a team of three and participated in what was to become the first of many case study competitions. And today I can proudly say that these competitions have been much more than an integral part of my two years of pursuing an MBA degree. If I were to enumerate the benefits that I have received from participating in these case studies, then they would be as follows:-

• Most of the cases that the companies float as competitions are real-world problems that either they are currently facing or have faced in the past and think that they might recur again. So attempting to solve these cases, gives you an understanding the industry, the firm, its business model, its revenue model, who its competitors are, etc. Most of the times, the cases contain information that is otherwise classified and not available on public forums, and hence, serve as invaluable insights into the company. But care must be taken that such information should not be used loosely.

• Management education has a lot to do with peer-learning. It is not possible to learn all that you can only in the classes and on top of that, the duration of the programme is a mere two years. Hence, these case competitions serve as excellent means of learning from students from other B-schools. It might often happen that when some other team is presenting their analysis, you chance upon a model or a framework that might be helpful going forward – or they might have analysed the case in a completely different yet logical manner and you gain a different perspective altogether.

• Generally, these competitions require the participants to submit their solutions either in the form of a Powerpoint presentation or a report or both. Therefore, the more you participate, the more adept you become in making slides and/or reports in Microsoft Word. The research that one does simply to gain insights into how consultants and the likes make their slides, becomes extremely helpful going forward. You can also develop your signature style of making presentation decks. It also gives you an excellent opportunity to learn the different tools and techniques in Microsoft Office.

• It might so happen that your expertise lies in Marketing, while others in your team might have their focus areas as Finance or Operations. Now since the solutions to the cases more often than not entails concepts from different disciplines of management, you get to learn from them as much as they get to learn from you – and all this happens without requiring any of you to pore over big bulky books or go through open-ended Internet sources. The secret to success here is to maximise the overall output of the team as a whole because you would not be judged as individuals.

• Once you are in a B-school, you are bound to be bitten by the placement bug – be it your Summer Internships or your Final Placements. CVs are the primary keys to shortlists and string resume points are quintessential in order to make you stand out from the rest. These case competitions are one of the best ways to fill up your CVs. Not only are most of them sponsored by well-known companies (many of which actually turn up in your campuses for recruitment), but also they are conducted on a national level which makes them all the more prestigious. But the only disclaimer is that you need to either come 1st, 2nd. Or 3rd in them in order to create the impact that you intend to. Merely participating in them might fall flat on your resumes. However, unless you participate, there is no chance that you can win – hence, enthusiasm is what matters!

• Lastly, almost all B-school case study competitions are well-funded and have quite a bounty up for grabs if you crack them successfully. And who on this beautiful planet does not love to earn a little extra while still pursuing an education! This serves as a wonderful motivation for putting on our thinking caps and coming up with break-through recommendations in order to resolve the companies’ issues!

I am not saying that this list is exhaustive. Many others might perceive these competitions differently, while there might also be people who consider them to be nothing more than distractions in their MBA life. There is nothing right or wrong about them. But people who have voluntarily participated in such competitions and have enjoyed them, would identify with the high that you get while presenting your analysis before a panel comprising the company’s top management. It does not take much to form a team of three, register, and give it a shot – at the end of the day, there is truly nothing to lose!

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Dipayan Sinha

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The Whereabouts of the Next Big Innovation

We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

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We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

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Message Author

We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

Message Author


Message Author

We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

Message Author


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We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

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We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

Message Author


Message Author

We, as a group of human beings, always tend to believe that the best things are lying ahead of us. Whatever has happened was good, the present scenario is not that great, but the future is what will alleviate all our sufferings. With this line of thought, it is only normal for us to think that the next big thing is yet to come up – and I do abide by this. Now, when I talk about the next big ‘thing’, I am referring to an innovation that would not only be disruptive but also inclusive. To add some context to what I am talking about, it would be pertinent to recall how the great Mr Dhirubhai Ambani revolutionized the mobile telecommunication industry in India. Putting a mobile phone in the pocket of every Indian citizen was a dream that he dreamt and also brought to fruition.

It would be difficult for me to pin-point exactly what the next big innovation is going to be, which sector would it be catering to, and when can we expect it to see the light of day. But what I do have a little idea about is where we can expect the innovation to come from and what would be its impact on society at large. It is very easy to identify the sectors which are seeing the highest growth rates and put our money on any one of them. It would also make sense to some people to go through the disciplines where the most number of Nobel Prizes have been awarded over the last two decades, and say that one of them would spark off the next big innovation. But that does not always work out. Hence, that debate would be an endless one.

My understanding says that the innovation is going to come from people who need it the most. A logical approach would be to identify nations plagued with problems yet having a flavour for research and scientific discovery. If that be true, then the developing nations come under the purview of such countries. An interesting new trend that has come up in recent times is the fact that the adjectives used for the word ‘problem’ have become fusion words. For example, in a global or a societal context, we no longer use terms like – ‘political problems’, ‘economic problems’, or ‘technological problems’. They have been replaced by terms like – ‘socio-political problems’, ‘socio-economic problems’, or ‘techno-political problems’. This suggests that the realms or spheres affected by a particular problem are broadening and the same time also overlapping. Hence, the next big innovation is going to have to be a panacea for multiple issues.

Now, let me talk about the effect(s) that this change should have on the people. If I were to summarize it in one sentence, I would say that the next big innovation would seek to unify the masses rather than discriminate among them. It would serve as a frame of common reference that would be accessible and more importantly, affordable for the majority of the populace. This is in line with what I had mentioned previously – that the change mandatorily needs to be inclusive. If we take the example of a country as diverse as India where the society is both horizontally and vertically stratified, then it needs to percolate and positively impact people from all those strata. In other words, it should be a means to try and demolish the incumbent diversity in society.

Another very important aspect that needs attention is recognizing the innovation when it happens and giving it the due support. This support needs to be in the form of financial backing, technical expertise, regulatory clearances, etc. It is very easy to dismiss ideas as either too ambitious or too redundant and in doing so, we might have already lost out on a million viable ones that were worth pursuing. The spirit of entrepreneurship needs to be rekindled at the earliest and it needs to be done everywhere in the world, especially in places which are not very familiar with it. More tolerance towards entrepreneurial ideas would imply more people putting creative thought into solving persistent problems and consequently, would imply better solutions and enhanced productivity levels.

I have always maintained that entrepreneurship would be the means for both job creation as well as wealth creation, and hence, investing in it is non-negotiable for any country. Once this is taken care of, the next big innovation would just be a matter of time. The only flipside to it would be the fact that we would realize its impact only in hindsight. But that should not be a major deterrent at all because, at the same time, it gives all of us an equal opportunity of becoming great and making it to the pages of history.

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Dipayan Sinha

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