Four Weeks Down – D. Susrith’s Internship Story – IIM Visakhapatnam

“So, how was the Civil War movie?” asked my friend who was interning in Hyderabad. “Expensive, and I am not talking about its production values” I replied, and my friend’s response before hanging up was “It’s Delhi, you should have expected it”. I thought to myself “this isn’t the only thing that has proved my expectations wrong”. I went back to my apartment and slipped off on the bed to relax. But you know the mind- when the body says ‘relax’, the mind says ‘let me go take a walk down the memory lane’.

It all started somewhere around the last week of April, we were busy preparing for end term and for the upcoming internship. I wasn’t sure about others, but I was pretty excited as it was going to be my first time in an organization, working for the organization along with different kinds of employees. I was happy that the recruiter trusted me to work for his company. Oh no, the company was going to get affected by the work I do, so I cannot afford to go wrong and that thought scared me. But life ain’t what it seems before we experience it ourselves. The company was a start-up and its culture got me hooked up to it on the first day itself. The employees were welcoming, the CEO was amiable, the peers were fun to work with, I am talking Contra level fun. So, it’s only natural I liked working there.

I was given the flexibility to work on whatever I feel like working on, as long as it is intended for the company. I am focused on marketing, I worked on Adverts, SEO, Ads for the company, surveying the customers and so on. But that wasn’t the point, some things we work on yield good results, some don’t; some experiments explode right on your face. Whenever something goes wrong, the project manager says “hey, there will be a first time for everything. Just try to figure out what went wrong and explain us so that nobody else would repeat it.” My good work day includes some Schezwan for lunch and all other perks you have in a good organization.

I think the company along with many other similar ones has finally found the recipe for a healthy organization. ‘You make employees happy and they give their best without breaking a sweat.’ It has been four weeks and my excitement levels haven’t gone down for the reasons I just cited! Looking forward to four more fun filled, learning loaded weeks.

D. Sushrith

PGP 15-17

IIM Visakhapatnam

 

———

Read more about internship diaries here.

Read more about IIM Visakhapatnam here.

 


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

‘I Must Have Taken And Analysed More Than 50 Mock CATs Almost Every Year’ – Commerce Grad At IIM Visakhapatnam

In our special series, we endeavor to bring together experiences of students belonging to diverse academic backgrounds  and how they made it to the top schools of the country, especially when the MBA scenario is highly dominated by engineers. This series is an attempt not only towards highlighting success stories but also to cement the fact that there are many roads to clinch a seat at the premier schools of the country.

Abhishek Jain hails from a small town named Kishanganj near Siliguri, and yet he has made it to one of the top schools in India – DPS R.K. Puram, New Delhi and then to one of the best colleges in the country – St. Xavier’s Calcutta. He believes that success isn’t limited by how small your hometown is. He has a flair for writing and also maintains a blog at dubsjain.wordpress.com. A BBA in Marketing has made him develop an inclination towards the fields of brand management and advertising. Following it up with a stint at Groupon India in the capacity of a Marketing Consultant has further sharpened his skills and passion towards the same.

 

How does it feel to be one of the few non-engineers at an IIM?

It feels great, to say the least. The fact that only about 10% of the students at IIMs comprise of non-engineers, having made it up here makes you feel confident about challenging stereotypes. In the campus, it feels different. You know you have different strengths and weaknesses. The idea is to embrace your identity. You know there are subjects like Marketing and Economics which can go a long way in feeding your ego and at the same time there is Quant to make you feel so little about yourself. The amusing thing is that the situation is exactly the opposite for the rest of the batch. But this is where the entire ecosystem of a B-School comes into play. Just because you’re not good at something doesn’t mean you’re of no good. In a b-school, someone may be a marketing god but may nearly fail their quantitative methods exam. Another bloke might be exceptionally brilliant at corporate valuation models but might have trouble writing reports. Everyone has their own unique strengths. You just need to figure out what yours are.

 

What prompted you to take the plunge and pursue a management degree after graduating in Business Administration?

Coming from a commerce background and not opting for a CA, an MBA was always at the back of my mind. The only question was when and from where. My tryst with CAT started back in the year 2012 when I was only in the final year at St. Xavier’s. It was always the next logical step after a BBA in Marketing. In fact, I remember I had even taken admission at a premium college then (XIMB). Had I not opted out, I would have passed out by now and been an alumnus already. It was, however, my love for marketing that made me opt out. I had converted HRM. I virtually went on to work for a renowned  E-Commerce company in Marketing, but an MBA was always due. When I converted IIM Visakhapatnam which was mentored by IIM B this year, I thought it was time.

 

Being from a non-engineering background, how was it to prepare for CAT? What was your preparations strategy?

Similar to several non-engineering students, Quant was always my Achilles’ Heel and the major portion of the preparation was devoted towards the same. However, you must have known by now that this was not the first time that I had taken the CAT. It was a regular in my calendar every year like the Diwali or Holi. With time, I had known how to tame my Achilles’ Heel. I think I must have taken and analysed more than 50 mock CATs almost every year. The strategy though was simple every time – clear the cut-offs in Quant and maximise the score in LR/DI and Verbal Ability. In 2015, the level of difficulty of Quant was comparatively a lot easier than the previous years. I think that helped too.

 

Did your academic background help you have an advantage in terms of academics at the Business School?

Absolutely. I have been already introduced to most of the subjects in the course during my graduation at St. Xavier’s, although the depth and way of teaching at an IIM are totally different.  Coming from a different background showers you with a different perspective and it always helps in Class discussions and Group work. It feels good when your peers approach you to discuss cases for a subject you have had a previous experience in (like Marketing in my case). You are also clear on what you want out of the B-School so you have the road planned out. When your peers are contemplating to choose between Marketing and Finance, you are confused between Category Management and Sales. But again this might be a double-edged sword.

 

What are your expectations after having graduated from IIM V? What kind of roles would you like to pursue? (in terms of career opportunities)

I would love to go back to E-Commerce in the roles of Category Management or Marketing. The fast changing world of E-Commerce and the level of flexibility and autonomy one gets in the same in unmatched. I am also interested in media and sports management and will be eager to explore any opportunities presented to me in the same. I am confident that the exposure at IIM Visakhapatnam will provide me with the platform to pursue the same.

 

Any message for the non-engineers aspiring to join an IIM?

The journey up to here might seem difficult, but it is amazing once you have made it. The number of non-engineers in IIMs is increasing every year. There is a reason why the IIMs are giving brownie points to you during admission. I don’t think there is anything for any non-engineer to be intimidated. In fact, it is an advantage if you are coming from a diverse background to any B-School. So just be confident and believe that you make it to any B-School of your choice.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Campus Fin-Gods – The CAs – Many Roads To An MBA

Priyanka is a CA and a commerce graduate from Narsee Monjee College, Mumbai. Her interests include reading, writing articles, meeting new people and discovering new places. She is particularly interested in the nuances of the Indian economy. In her leisure, she likes to play badminton.

How does it feel to be one of the few non-engineers at an IIM?

It is a unique feeling. It has the added advantages of being from the finance field, accompanied by hurdles when it comes to Quant. It’s about having an overall view of things and not being confined to any field in particular. Along with enriching yourself it boils down to how a diverse team collectively works to accomplish set objectives in a synergistic way, given time constraints!

What prompted you to take the plunge and pursue a management degree after completing your Chartered Accountancy?

CA is recognized as the top most degree in Accountancy and opens up avenues to the exciting field of finance. Having interacted with the top management of many entities during my professional life at PwC made me realize that there is something more that I can take up. And hence the decision to pursue MBA, which would give me a holistic view of the business operations in a greater depth and would thus refine my abilities at dealing with the greater challenges faced by businesses.

Being from a non-engineering background, how was it to prepare for CAT? What was your preparations strategy?

When preparing for the CAT, I realized that there were some topics that I had been out of touch and needed brushing up. I was reasonable in the verbal section and had difficulties with LR in particular. I prepared in the last month before CAT when I had taken leave from work. I focused on solving chapters that I didn’t know and practiced questions from the past CAT exams. That worked fairly well for me.

Did your academic background help you have an advantage in terms of academics at the Business School?

Both yes and no! Yes, because there have been many subjects that were covered by me during the CA course. No, because there are courses which weren’t covered at all, example, Statistics. Thus while Financial Accountancy, Corporate Finance and Management Accounting were easier to manage, QM-1 and QM-2 gave me a tough time. My academic background has helped me in the sense that it has made me strong enough to never give up. It has made me live up to the saying, ‘When the going gets tough, the tough get going!’

How has your journey at IIM V been so far? How do you think exposure to management education has honed your skills? Do you think there was a gap in your skills which has been filled due to this course? 

Journey so far has been enriching beyond description. It was terrific. Management education at IIMV hasn’t only taught me the academics but has changed me as a person. It has taught me to be able to handle people and situations more calmly. It has made me very conscious about myself and my surroundings. MBA at IIMV has given me the ability to deal with uncertainties. I can now easily juggle between tasks with mental calm. I am now more skilled at managing myself, people, tasks and challenges. In terms of the gaps that have been filled by my journey so far, I have now started making more informed and quick decisions and am equipped with more soft skills. I am now better equipped to assume leadership roles.

Tell us something about your internship experience. Do you think your under graduation help you during those 2 months of industry interaction?

I interned in Transactions Advisory – Valuation Services at Ernst & Young, which mainly deals with valuation of companies for regulatory and M&A purposes. It was a unique experience wherein I could connect the Corporate Strategy and Finance that I had studied as a part of my education. CA degree and experience at PwC helped me handle the finance and people aspect of my job better. It was an interesting experience wherein I understood the nitty gritty of valuations.

What are your expectations after having graduated from IIM V?  What kind of roles would you like to pursue?

I am keen on pursuing a career in a corporate finance role. However, I haven’t zeroed down on it yet. I am still evaluating combinations in finance and strategy.

Any message for the non-engineers aspiring to join an IIM?

It isn’t that MBA is only meant for engineers. With patience and determination, everything can be achieved. Know your weaknesses and focus on your strengths. From my experience, the journey after CAT is every bit worth the effort. A world of opportunities awaits you.

To conclude, where there is a will, there is a way! Do your best and God will take care of the rest! Good Luck!


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Disruptive Innovation: Implementing Technology for Businesses – Kunal, IIM Visakhapatnam

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Message Author

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Message Author

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Message Author

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Message Author

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Message Author

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author

Message Author

Reading about Ron’s car rescuing him and Harry from the Acromantula colony in J.K. Rowling’s bestselling book “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets”, I remember wondering as a kid whether driverless cars were indeed possible in real life. However, Harry Potter, being the story of a magical world, I was quick to dismiss the idea. It might have seemed far-fetched at that point but watching Johnny cabs, the artificial intelligence powered cars in “Total Recall” and then those sleek self-driven cars in “Minority Report”, the idea  no more seems as absurd as it seemed earlier. With the advent of technology, driverless cars have now become a reality. However, autonomous cars are not the only “big thing” of this century. We are uniquely poised to witness the relentless parade of new technologies. Emerging disruptive technologies such as 4D printing, advanced genomics, routers that can recharge devices in a few miles radius, energy storage devices, Apple Pencil that can translate movements of the hand directly to a computer without needing a scan, to name a few, have the potential to disrupt the status quo and alter the way people live and work.

In the words of Prof. Clayton Christensen, disruptive technologies are “simple, convenient-to-use innovations that initially are used by only unsophisticated customers at the low end of markets”. More often than not, established companies have trouble in handling the disruptive technologies because they are not prepared to tackle the challenges that they bring forth. The industry giants focus on improving their products and services for their more valued and higher revenue-generating customers thereby making more profits in the short term but in the process they overlook the demands of the other segments, thus paving the way for new entrants who enter the market with an idea or a product or a service and carve out a niche for themselves by targeting those under served segments.

Disruptive technology powered businesses gradually gain a foothold by delivering more suitable functionality at a lower price. With successive refinements, they start to gain higher-end customers as well thereby reshaping the entire industry and eventually displacing the original leaders. For example, record stores were disrupted by iTunes and Google Play Store, video rental stores by Netflix, conventional cable operators by TataSky and Airtel, SMS services by WhatsApp and Hike, long distance calls by Skype, local stores by eBay, taxis by Uber and Ola, newspapers by Twitter, research libraries by Google, bookstores by Kindle, conventional shopping by Amazon and Snapdeal, automobile industry by Google and Tesla, money transfer by M-Pesa and Airtel etc. Businesses worldwide have quite a lot instances to share when disruptive technologies completely altered the entire dynamics of business practices and took the organisation to next stage of evolution or revolution providing great returns.

In the year 2000, Dow Corning, a market leader in silicone solutions industry, faced challenges due to stagnation in growth, price-seeking behaviour of the customers and commoditization of its products. As ‘Commodity Magnet’ is not a very encouraging phenomenon for any organisation, the leadership team at Dow Corning decided to fight it through innovation and disruptive technology measures. They were successful in launching ‘Xiameter’, an online portal for providing commoditized silicone products which catered to price-seeking segment which didn’t require specialized services from Dow Corning for silicone solutions. The move proved to be strategically very successful as they were open to acquire a large market share in commodity market and the technological innovation even helped them increase revenue in their mainstream business model.

A report by McKinsey Global Institute estimates that the applications of the 12 technologies discussed in the report would have a potential economic impact between $14 trillion and $33 trillion a year in 2025. Consequently, it is imperative for business leaders to keep their strategies updated in the face of continually evolving technologies, ensure that their organizations continue to look ahead and use technologies to improve internal performance. Disruptive technologies can be game-changers for businesses, therefore, it is needed that even established businesses plan for a variety of scenarios and not be afraid to look beyond long-established models even if it seems risky at the time. On a lighter note, perhaps they could take inspiration from Kevin who dared to look beyond the monotonous life he and his fellow minions were leading and decided to go out in search of their new boss despite the misgivings everyone in the colony had.

Companies around the world require disruptive technology measures to either differentiate their products or to decrease their cost to serve or produce. With the advent of Information Technology (IT), many industries have undergone drastic changes. Technology applications are very dynamic and require continuous upgradation due to rising expectations and the ever evolving requirements of businesses. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have proved to be one such disruptive measure in many industries. Such technology tools help organisations to reduce their operating costs, decrease their manpower requirements and improve efficiency. Disruptive measures challenge the conventional ideas of doing business, lead to new venture or product creation, change the organisational structure and even alter the dimension to measure the profitability or progress of a business. Disruptions or innovations lead to a new S-curve for most of the organisations, hence it is very essential for all the organisations worldwide to identify their stage in the S-curve and introduce appropriate measures.

image1

There is a requirement of technology group or Research & Development centre in almost all the organisations to introduce or work on technology innovations or disruptive measures. Most of such teams work in a very organic way and are mostly driven by super ordinate goals of an organisation to continuously improve its functioning. Disruptive measures can be in any department or any domain of an organisation right from purchase management to assembly lines to inventory control to product design and even in customer relationship. Technology can enable even novice or new entrants in any industry to sustain its business in presence of incumbents or established organisations. Disruptive technology measures can be a game changer for any player in the market. Google was not the first organisation to launch search engine but they were disruptive enough to introduce the most relevant search results based on their superior technology algorithm. ‘What you do?’ is mostly not very important in business world but ‘How you do?’ is what differentiates or enables an organisation to reach new heights.

It is equally important for governments to use these advances in technology to their own benefit and address their own operational challenges. For example, deploying the Internet of Things to improve infrastructure and developing smart cities to increase productivity and deliver public services more efficiently and effectively. Technology innovations can lead to improved efficiency in government processes which will revive economic growth and in turn help businesses to blossom. Businesses can also contribute by sharing their disruptive measures with the government and aid them acquire skills through some suitable tie ups.

That being said, the examples listed above are all success stories. Disruptive technologies may face greater resistance than conventional ones and have to be at times tailor-made to suit the needs of the niche segment. Further, they have to constantly improve and innovate to match the competition that already exists in the market. As a result they may even fail but in that case, they must then incorporate the lessons learned from this failure into the next opportunity.

It is quintessential for businesses to implement technology measures which are disruptive enough to challenge conventions and which can lead to next phase of growth, both for the organisation and humanity in general.


IIM Visakhaptnam

Message Author