Why You Should Not Do An MBA

What the MBA craze tells us about ourselves

Why are youngsters ‘crazy’ about management?

Is it, that as a child they loved being managers and decided they would like to do it all their lives? Did they play manager-manager creating sales plans or mortgages? Does management as a discipline represent the highest expression of their gifts? Is it a natural transition from engineering?

I would argue that an MBA is the easiest way to move into an upper middle-class lifestyle in India today.

Any reasonably smart person can make it to a top 20 B School and get started on climbing the corporate ladder. Compared to being a coding coolie, they can now command the lesser-fortunate non-MBAs to follow their company’s diktats.

Over the two years, they learn a specialized language that lets them opt into what is often an exploitative structure – the corporation. Very soon, they are a part of it, tweaking their passions towards what lets them rise in the ranks, make more money and rise even more.

How do we get extremely intelligent youngsters excited about biscuit packaging or equations that sit on excel sheets? How do we convince them that what they do counts? How do we make them sit for hours in boring meetings and keep work hours beyond anything considered reasonable?

We provide a lot of money to go with the work. But that isn’t enough. So we create an elaborate drama that helps these behaviours stay in place. We design ‘performance metrics’ that will go up if you skip meeting your old sick uncle and attend the company off-site instead.

All of this adds up – as fat on the belly, as strained relationships and as weekends where the only energy left is to shop and consume (mostly trashy) entertainment.

Sure, they are free to sneak in that odd music hobby or a trek – but for most parts of their lives they are to stay motivated towards the goals of the owners (shareholders) whom they haven’t even met.

Why would an individual work so hard to get an opportunity to do this work? Are so many people discovering their passion in these monoliths?

Or have we convinced our youngsters that the only life worth living is the ‘good life’? Have we advertised expensive homes and swanky cars just a little too much? Have we instilled a fear in them that if they don’t become a banker or a marketeer, they are destined to a life of misery and poverty?

Zoom into a CAT class and there sits a youngster working so hard to do a quant problem. He may hate math but this is what he needs to do to get ‘in’. He may have no clue what an MBA really entails, but continues to labour on. It is an expensive club to enter, and once he enters, he is going to have a lot of fun (it seems).

But many of these 200,000 children writing CAT every year may have found success and fulfillment on many other paths. We may be losing many artists, inventors, entrepreneurs and independent professionals to this machinery.

Some of our CAT-writers may even succeed because they are so bright. But that will still not change the fact that it was never their passion in the first place. Perhaps, it will be discovered in their mid life crisis.

The MBA craze tells us that we have failed to create other options. It reminds us of the existence of an overly rewarded courtier (whose life’s work is to support the power of the kings). The MBA craze co-opts some of our best brains to work on problems that are neither our most pressing nor the ones these kids may have a passion to solve.
Somewhere, we have messed this one up.

 

——–

Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here.


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author

The Highest ROI Activity You Can Do At B School

During your MBA, you will learn a very intriguing idea – Return on Investment.

Measured in financial terms, ROI is what you gain (monetary return) for what you put in (financial investment). The higher the ROI, the better the investment.

This is an imperfect metric. A lot of ‘return’ (what you get from doing something) and investment (what you put into an activity) both can’t be measured in money alone. In fact, most of our investments in student life are in terms of time and emotions.

So it may be interesting to look at what the various activities you do ‘yield’ as an ROI. Calculations like this excite the management nerd within me!

So here are some that were ROI calculations for me

Activity Investment Returns ROI
Attending class attentively Unavoidable Time Investment + Emotional Energy* (optional – you may sleep through class) Grades -> Feel good Average
Regular Revision Small bits of regular time + discipline Better grades than others -> Positively rippling into placements and other opportunities (Blame relative grading!) High
Attending L Square Parties A whole block of weekend time + Physical Energy + Disturbing sleep cycle Bonding, emotional recharge and lots of fun! TOTALLY worth it!
Exercise (I attempted it) Regular time Health (I did not value health as much at that time) Low
Bro Bonding (with the gang) Moderate time Emotional support + dope on what’s up! High
Extra Curricular activities Depending on which clubs you choose Depends on how you leverage your extra currics – I did it because I loved doing it Depends on choice of activity
Relationship** Very High Time + Emotional Energy (especially consuming relationships) SEE BELOW (Optionality) Depends on “Option Value”

** : Optionality – Your campus relationships may succeed or fail. The ROI on your relationship depends on where it goes (and often at that age, we are still climbing the learning curve). So, weigh the return by the probability of success or failure – a relationship with regular fights can drain you out!

As you can see, the return on an activity also depends on how much you VALUE that return. You may not care for marks at all and that would make your ROI on studies very low (because you don’t really care for what you get). On the other hand, you may love hanging out with your friends and that will make it a very high ROI activity.

Hence, a time investment portfolio that aligns with your values gives you the most optimal returns – for example, investing in debt, equity, derivatives or metals based on your risk profile.

However, there is one activity that is sure to give you an exponential return on your time and leverage on all the remaining activities. It is that one activity that, if done well can help you manage the rest.

You already know what I am pointing to – it is REFLECTION.

There is no substitute for living what Thoreau called an ‘examined life’. Consciously investing your time across different activities requires you to think about –

  1.     What you want and value
  2.     What you can afford (in terms of time and emotional energy)
  3.     What you will get as returns (which is directly linked to how much you invest)

And this rarely happens by accident. It has to happen by design. And that design requires time and thinking.

So head for a regular walk in the woods. Spend time as regularly as you can to just get a sense of where you are heading, what is going on, what do the indicators of your life (grades, emotional health, tempo) say.

The habit of regularly reflecting has helped me clarify what I really wanted. It has given me the courage to act in that direction. It has helped me carve out a life that I can truly own as an expression of my unique self.

Irrespective of whatever else you do, this is one activity that is a sure-shot, tax free return on whatever time you invest in it!


—–-
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here.


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author

Fuck Validation

Who have you given the authority? The authority to tell you that you are okay or even great?

Does it belong to your parents who approve of your career choice? Have you authorized your teacher to give you that extra ounce of attention that makes you feel everything is perfect?

Are you going to let your marks or certificates validate you? Or will it be your summer job?

Here’s an experiment. Why not fuck validation?

Imagine for a moment that nobody is validating what you do.

There is no one to tell you what to do or what is okay. There is no yardstick that tells you whether your actions are desirable or not. There is no audience, no one nodding or patting your back.

What would you do now?

What would you Really do? What would you do from the core of your being, from that part of yourself that comes out when you are totally free?

What would you do without any plan, without validation from your identity or past?

Being born as a human being is a license to be free. And this freedom is the freedom to go beyond limits that can’t be crossed.

It is the choice to opt out from what you don’t agree with (exams, formal education, marriage, religion). It is the freedom to dance naked (or sing ‘badly’, write poetry or act like your super-hero) in your room when no one is watching. It is trying out whatever you wanted to but were told not to*.

And along with these, it is the courage to know and deal with the consequences that will come from such actions**.

Can you bring that into your life right now? Can you act from that madness, that ‘craziness’, that originality.

Can you behave in ways that are not “normal” but are uniquely you?

So here is the invitation once again – fuck validation. Do something that has absolutely no chance of validation.

Then see what comes out.

That may be much closer to the real you.

P.S :
* – this EXCLUDES anything you do to others without their consent
** – Don’t get arrested, killed, addicted or disabled – that apart, you’re mostly okay.

P.P.S:
As for me, like everyone else, validation mattered. But through my late 20s and early 30s, I began a journey of weaning away from this addiction.

Every once in a while,step outside your skin and do something that you would never have done. An act that may even generate disapproval. For me, it was this article. What will it be for you?

(Featured Image courtesy arjundesai.org)

—–-
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here.


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author

3 Cricketers And Dealing With Life

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author


Message Author

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author


Message Author

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author


Message Author

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author


Message Author

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author


Message Author

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author


Message Author

For the longest time, Sachin Tendulkar was my favourite cricketer. He was the hero of our generation – a great place to park all our hopes, admiration and adulation.

His strokes, aah! Sheer perfection. Immaculate timing. We’d watch the match only to see Sachin play. As soon as he was out, many television sets would go off. The match didn’t seem the same again.

I want to live life the way Sachin plays.

Live a life where I stand out and shine in mastery. A life where I am showing up like a genius. Where my timing is impeccable. Where everything I do seems like magic.

There are times in our life when we are batting on that perfect pitch. Where every stroke we hit goes to the ropes. Where the runs are adding up and the crowds are cheering. When we are the star of the moment.

These are the ‘Sachin’ moments of life. These are times to go all out, to give our best and to shine. To try the crazy things because they will work like a charm. A Sachin zone is where good luck meets excellence – a great pitch and unbelievable form, and you’re ready to face any bowling attack in the world.

But life isn’t always like that. There are tough times. There are times when the pitch is exceedingly difficult to bat on, a bowler’s delight. Wickets are tumbling and there is a suicide waiting to happen.

These are not times for Sachin, who we might lose to a bad stroke. These are times for another cricketer who I first knew, then was interested in and now I deeply admire. Rahul Dravid.

On a bad pitch, Dravid is your man. Called ‘The Wall’, Dravid could stay and stay forever. In face of extreme difficulty, his was the ability to wait it out. Nothing fancy, nothing overly cool except an occasional stroke. Most importantly, not doing anything foolish.

There have been many difficult pitches where Dravid and Dravid alone has survived while everyone around him crashed.

What let him stay there? I would say it was his sense of humility to the conditions. The conditions were not great, it was not time to shine but to survive. It was time to make friends with difficulty and suffering and wait it out.

There are patches in life where we need to be in the Dravid zone. We can see that things are going wrong – they are simply not working out. All that one tries to do causes only more trouble. It is a Bad Time.

What does one do at such a time? One does what Dravid did – just wait it out. Like a Wall, steady and letting the whirlwinds pass. With dignity and patience, one hour at a time, one ball at a time. Only an occasional shot, very carefully crafted and played with discernment.

Very often, we end up doing the opposite. We try to play like Sachin when times are bad or tend to err on the side of being Dravid when the tide is in our favour.

So how do we know what to do? This is when we need one of India’s most successful captains – Mahendra Singh Dhoni.

To be Dhoni is to be cool, calm and collected. It is to sense which time it is – is it a good time or a bad time. Dhoni is the ever watchful presence that lets you witness what is going on in your life at any given time.

You can activate the Dhoni mode with meditation, reflection, time in nature or journalling. It is Dhoni who tells you whether Sachin should be on strike or Dravid. And you can count on Dhoni to remind you that ‘this too shall pass’.

So there it is – Sachin, Dravid and Dhoni. Between choosing from the style of these three cricketers, you can live a life that works for you and honours what ‘Time’ you are going through in your life 🙂

—–
Abhishek Thakore is a full-time lover of life. He is a published author, leadership educator and a movement builder. He is the founder of The Blue Ribbon Movement. He is also a Gold Medalist and an alumnus of IIM Bangalore – Class of 2005 and. He contributed one of InsideIIM’s first stories in 2011. You can read other stories by Abhishek here..


Abhishek Thakore

Message Author