‘My Verbal Was Strong, So I Focused On Other Sections’ – CA Anuja Rege, IIM Lucknow

In our special series, we endeavour to bring together experiences of students belonging to diverse academic backgrounds  and how they made it to the top schools of the country, especially when the MBA scenario is highly dominated by engineers. This series is an attempt not only towards highlighting success stories but also to cement the fact that there are many roads to clinch a seat at the premier schools of the country.

As a part of the series, we introduce Anuja Rege, a chartered accountant currently pursuing PGDM (2015-2017) at IIM Lucknow.

Tell us about your background.
I am a BCom. Graduate from HR College, Mumbai. I completed my articleship of 3 years in EY, then continued to work there for 21 months.

When and why did you think of changing directions to pursue an MBA?
I was doing audit work for about 5 years. During the course, I learned about several businesses, recommended several strategic changes that benefited clients, some of them listed and MNCs. Then I began to realize that an MBA will provide me with a global perspective, help me see from the other side of the table i.e. understand doing business, making strategic choices and not merely compliances/ after effects of decisions. Also, an MBA would give me a role to play in devising strategy of a company, which will help me use my prowess to the fullest.

 

It’s usually said that it is difficult for non-engineers to handle CAT. Your take on it and how did you prepare for it? (Basic timeline and topics covered)
I joined a coaching center in June for Nov CAT. I attended weekend classes but was unable to study much as I was still working. I ensured that I revised what was taught and paid special emphasis on Quant, as CPT (right after standard XII) was when I had done that much of Math, barring some statistics and other basics during BCom. I also took a 1.5-month leave from EY in October to study.

I was quite regular and planned how to cover all books. Had a good understanding of verbal, so focused more on the other 3 sections. Daily, did 2 of the 4 (DI logic, verbal etc.) in order to maintain balance and not get bored, especially since almost 2 years had passed since I had last studied (CA Finals in May 2013).

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Your take on the rigor of MBA life and how has it been so far for you?
I found the initial months at IIM Lucknow quite rigorous.

I had an advantage in some subjects (Term I and Term II) as I had already covered the basics in my commerce degree. The rigor is good as it taught me how to manage my time and resources better. Also, hectic audit work timings had already taught me to stay up late and manage work within deadlines, so work-ex aided the adaptation process.

 

Talk about your summer internship and how being a CA helped you in it?
I did my summers at McKinsey. I worked as a part of their own initiative of developing a benchmarking tool for hospitals across Asia. The work required extensive excel analytics, in which my work done during CA helped as I already had the basic skills. A general understanding of sectors already acquired during CA helped as well. I was also able to use my basic understanding of laws.

 

Any final word of advice to people trying to jump-shift from CA to MBA?
If you realize that it’s your calling, go for it. Life at an MBA school is very different and will definitely broaden your perspective of things, help you understand several aspects of business much differently. Hard work and patience already learned while studying for CA exams makes it relatively easier for you to cope with the B-School rigor.

 

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About the Author:

author2

 

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

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Quick Bites – Part 5 – Native Advertising

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

Native advertising refers to a form of disguised advertising. In this, the sponsored content matches the form and content of the platform. It is called native because of its similarity to the platform it appears on. The product and content are merged together. Also, there has to be a clear disclosure, whenever using this type of advertising. The problem with these type of advertisements is that mostly all sites become commercial sites and it gets difficult to differentiate the content from commercial offerings.

Three categories of Native Advertisements are:

1. In Feed/Social
Rolled out on all the social platforms. The promoted posts and the sponsored content comes under this category.
Examples: Google advertisements, above the organic search. Looks like the normal search results. Sponsored videos on Facebook. YouTube keyword search.

1

2. Recommended Content
On blog posts or websites, the recommended section comes under this category. ‘From the web’ headers are used by the advertisers to drive the relevant traffic to their pages.

21

3. Paid Inclusion
These are those posts and articles that are the most expensive and most effective. The whole advertisement appears to be a part of the content except for a small disclosure of ‘sponsored content’

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_________________

About the Author:

author

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

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Sensory Branding – Quick Bites – Part 4

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Sensory branding has taken the front seat in the marketing world. Brands are upgrading themselves and finding ways to attract consumers by forging their emotional association. Sensory marketing helps to seduce the customer to influence their feelings and create positive brand attitudes. It is a very personal way to market a product and helps them to experience the brand in a way to satisfy their hedonic desires. According to studies, 70% of customers believe that emotions account for 50% of their purchasing decision.

Examples of brands utilizing this to their advantage are:

1. Abercrombie and Fitch

The stores are designed to leverage the Olfactory, Visual and Aural senses of the customer. The stores smell strong of their fragrance range (Fierce No. 8) which helps attract customers to the stores. In their visuals, they utilize halo-effect through the use of models wherever possible. The stores are also designed to highlight only the clothes while the rest of the store is dark. The music is chosen to give a nightclub feel to the store, thus keeping with the young and cool image of the brand.

31

 

2. Apple

The brand utilizes sensory marketing through touch senses the feel of the products in their stores. Also, the visual senses are targeted through careful, delicate designs of the products. The sensory marketing is not just limited to the product but is extended to the stores itself, which are designed to facilitate the visual and aural emotional build-up of the customers.

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3. Singapore Airlines

They have targeted the olfactory senses. They introduced the aroma called Stefan Floridian Waters, that is very unique, and blended in attendant’s perfume, towel services etc. This evokes a feeling of comfort and luxury for the fliers. It enhances their experience and makes the travel relaxing.

 

4. Coke

Coke uses sensory marketing in its adverts when it utilized the fizzy visuals and the sound of the fizz in all the communication. Each advertisement comprises of these sensory elements that help create a feeling of nostalgia and craving amongst its consumer base.

 

 

You can check out other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:

1. Understanding Brand Equity

2. Guerrilla marketing

3. Crowdsourcing

 

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About the Author:

author

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

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Crowdsourcing – Quick Bites – Part 3

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author


Message Author

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author


Message Author

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author


Message Author

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author


Message Author

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author


Message Author

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author


Message Author

Author’s Note: Quick Bites is a series of write-ups on various marketing concepts. I decided to come up with this series to help people understand these concepts better through a few easy to read posts. Any comments or suggestions for the next topic are welcome. Cheers!

 

Crowdsourcing is the concept through which companies generate services, content or ideas by utilising the inputs of a large group of people external to the organisation. The most frequently used source is the online community of the brand or the company. It helps to gain a diversity of opinions and makes it easy and cost-effective for the organisation to collect consumer preference data.

This is mostly done in the form of competitions or innovation challenges or through brand communities that provide a way for the organisation to learn beyond what employees bring to the table. Crowdsourcing has also been used to develop common goods like Wikipedia.

Some great examples of companies utilising crowdsourcing to generate value through consumers are:

 

1. My Starbucks Idea

Starbucks launched this platform to help their customers design and innovate products according to their needs and satisfaction. It has been a tremendous success and a source of ideas for products like Cake Pops, free WiFi and Hazelnut Macchiato. Apart from product innovation, this also helped consumers help the company to improve their in-store experience and gauge their involvement levels.

1

 

2. Lays

The crowdsourcing platform ‘Do Us A Flavour’ launched by the company, helped the brand to encourage the customers to come up with new innovative flavours. This helped consumers get involved with the brand through their involvement.

2

 

3. Airbnb

Airbnb created their marketing campaign with the help of their customers. They combined videos of different customers’ places into one to endorse their brand as authentic and ‘just like home’. With this campaign, they not only acquired the authentic image but also saved a lot of money on their marketing spend.

3

 

4. Unilever’s Foundry Ideas.

It is a global crowdsourcing community that puts the consumers to think on lines of sustainability innovation. It brings together consumers, opinion leaders and other innovators. The ideas that have evolved through this are the ones on Global Nutrition, Reinventing laundry to be less water intensive etc.

You can also check-out the other ‘Quick Bites’ write-ups through the following links:
1. Understanding Brand Equity
2. Guerrilla Marketing

———

About the Author:

Priyanka_Grover

Priyanka is a second-year MBA student at Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow and is a member of InsideIIM’s second student team. She is also a part of PRiSM, The Marketing Cell at IIM Lucknow.

Profile gravatar of Priyanka Grover

Priyanka Grover

Message Author